Automatically Apply a Discount Code in Shopify

Posted on 09. Aug, 2016 in Advanced Tricks, Development, Tweaks

How’s it going? I’ve got a lot of things to cover today. I’ve got the Shopify documentary on how they went about going and creating the presentation for when they went public. I’ve got a great demo on how to do discount codes, and there’s been a few slight changes to the app on the Shopify dashboard. That’s all next.

Yesterday, Shopify put on their YouTube channel a short documentary about how they went about for their investors for when they went public. I highly recommend you check it out. I put a link to it right here. I watched this, and this speaks exactly to why all of the partners love Shopify so much, just the way they think about problems and the way they go about this. Next up, we’ve got a quick demo that I’m going to show you on discount codes, and then I’m going to show you how they’ve changed the app page. Let’s jump into it.

Offering discount codes is a great way to encourage shoppers in order to buy additional stuff from your store. One of the great user experiences is if you can automatically apply the discount code when the customer clicks a button or adds a certain number of things to their cart, and there’s a way to do this in Shopify. It’s one of those hidden features that once you find out about it, you can’t believe that you lived without it. What I’m going to do is I’m going to show you how to set that up. The first thing we want to do is we want to go to our dashboard, and we want to actually set up a discount code.

Let’s go to discount codes, and we’re going to add in … I’ve already added in a discount code called cyber deals, but I’m going to add in another one here, and we’re going to call this fall deals, or actually we’re going to call this free shipping. Free shipping. A free shipping discount code, and it’s going to offer free shipping for any shipping rate that’s less than or equal to say $10. It’s going to apply to all countries because that’s all I have set up. For right now, it’s going to be unlimited because it’s going to be auto applied. We’re going to hit save on that, and free shipping is what we’re going to use as our discount code.

The next thing we need to do is we need to actually go in to do some liquid changes. In order to make the discount code automatically apply to someone’s checkout, we need an action in order to do that. I’m going to use a page as a demo just because it’s easier for me to code it, and I don’t have to go into the templates, but this technique is always usable within side your template code. Every individual theme template that you have has different codes so you’re changing might be different in there, but the theory still applies. What we want to do is I’ve gone and created a page here with a free shipping button is what we’re going to put in here. Free shipping.

Then, in the code, what we’re going to do is first we’re going to highlight this. The link that we need to create is a URL stream that will automatically apply this discount code. This URL can be used on any type of button, so if you have a button that you’ve put on your WordPress site, this graphic goes to your Shopify cart or your Shopify store and you want it to apply a discount code because they came through a specific mailing list, you can use this link anyway. It’s just a matter of typing it in correctly. The first thing we want to do is we want to type in checkout because that is where we want the item to go to.

Then we want to have a question mark, which means we’re going to be adding a variable, and the variable we’re going to add in there is called discount. Then we’re going to add the discount code, free shipping, and this is the name of the code that we wanted. We’re going to hit insert link, and we’re going to save that. Then we’re going to jump over and we’re going to view it. We’re going to view the page. Once we’re on the page, we’re going to click on the free shipping link and we’ll see what happens. It now takes us to the checkout page, and we can see that the discount has automatically been applied to this product.

I can remove that and show you that it’s now been earned and we can refresh it. Sorry. Let’s remove that one there because discount is up in here in the URL. We are going to just refresh that there, and then what we can do is we can go back to this here and we can hit it again and we can see that it contains it in there. Anytime that you add the variable discount equals free shipping or discount equals discount code, it will then add it to your checkout, so it really allows you to expand your creativity when it comes to how you apply your discount.

That pretty much does it for this week. Don’t forget to like and subscribe to this video, and if you have any questions, you can always hit me up in the comments down below, or if you have a custom project that you need done, you can always book a call with me and I’d love to talk to you about it. That’s all for this week.

Using Shopify as a Wholesale Tool

Posted on 14. Apr, 2015 in About Shopify, Clients Websites, Development, Tweaks

What Leah had to say about the project

When I decided to build a new wholesale site, I didn’t know where to start. I’m so glad I found the guys at Sunbowl. They did a great job of planning the project with me so that we could create a great user experience. I like to learn how to edit things on my own, so I really appreciated the video tutorials they sent me. They were super helpful with figuring out the technical aspects of the project and were really timely with their delivery. I would highly recommend them to anyone!

The site was a huge success – we generated over 40K in sales in the first month.

Leah Emmott, CEO, Inner Fire Apparel

 

Everybody knows that Shopify is really great for doing your online e-commerce when you’re selling from business to customer. What I’m going to show you is if when you want to use Shopify in order to use it in a business to business situation. For example, I’m going to show you how it works really, really well and powerfully with a wholesale opportunity.

[00:02:00] With my Inner Fire, they already had a Shopify store and they wanted to add a wholesale component to that store. What we were able to do was use a second Shopify store in order to set that up for them. When you’re on the regular shop, just to compare. If we were a regular shopper and we wanted to buy some leggings we would pick the leggings that we wanted, then we would read through the descriptions and then we would add them to the cart and then we would get to check out.
We can change our quantities. We could see what we were purchasing and check out in a normal fashion. That works very well for buying single products. However, when you’re buying multiple products and if you’re doing a group buy, it’s not the best system to use because it’s very cumbersome and it’s hard to make sure that you got your orders correct. We did a little bit of a different approach to how to do it for a wholesale side of things.
Two things, one, the first thing we did is we wanted to make sure the wholesale side was password protected. There’s a lot of reasons for doing this. We wanted to be able to approve accounts for people to get there because they have to go through a certain credit check first. They have to be authorized dealers. There’s a lot of extra stuff that happens when you’re dealing with just wholesale clients.
When you go to the wholesale in your Fire account, it will take you to a login where the customer would then be able to log in and get to their site. Once they’ve logged in, they come to a nicely designed site just like you would normally have. If we were to go to the homepage it would come up wholesale site, very similar to their other site.

You can look up all different information. They have their polices, they have their FAQs, they have their look book, they have their catalogs. A lot of this stuff is new lines that are coming out that are not available to the public so it’s a different inventory.

When you go and actually select a t-shirt, which I have a sample here, you can see that the layout is slightly different than it was on their online store. The reason we built it this way was because we were finding it was very cumbersome to be adding one product to each cart by just copying over your existing store. There’s a lot of tweaks that need to happen when you’re opening up a second wholesale store.

The first thing with these guys is that you’re able to pick the graphics. I’m going to pick believe in yourself and I’m going to pick with a gray tanktop. We come down here and we get this great chart that tells us which products are in stock, which ones were out of stock and which ones we’re able to order. Theoretically, I can order 15 smalls, I can order four mediums, and I can order two larges. Say I wanted also to get the try coffee ones, I could order 20 here as well, maybe 10 here. Maybe they’re a little bit more popular and it will add them up on the right hand side.

These are just sample pricing that I’ve put in here for the purpose of this video but you can see that each item gets added together and it gives you a line item so you know how much each one of them is going to cost. If you’ve only got a specific budget, say you wanted to put a couple numbers in here and you knew that you only have $170 to spend on these particular items it’ll allow you to add it all up.
When you’re finished you can hit the Add to Cart icon. It will process everything and it will add it to the cart. It will add all your items to the cart. You could see your total number of items that are going to be checked out is 156. That only took me a couple seconds to put into the system, but if I was to do that one by one it would be a very cumbersome style of adding stuff over.

[00:04:00] If I go over to the cart, I can then see a preview of everything that I’m going to order. I can see the colors of my shirts. I can click on and see the graphic that I want to be able to be printed on the shirt. I could update my quantities and then I can also check my additional options. Do you need your items priced and is back ordering okay or are substitutions okay? It might be okay for you.

I can then go to my checkout and I can proceed through my checkout like I normally would. The cool thing about when you do the checkout is you’re able to go to checkout and you have to do a $300 minimum order so that you’re not dealing with these small order. Obviously if you’re a wholesale person and then you know you have the minimum order you need to make and you can make these type of check, it’s a user-friendly interface for buyers.
The buyers can sit down. They can really visually see what you’re looking at. They’re not looking through a catalog or filling out an Excel spreadsheet. Everything is accurately itemized and you can see the graphics of things that are going on and it works out very, very well. I’m going to update some of these here too a little bit more. I’m going to say I’m going to get 300 of them.

Refresh it there and now I’m above my minimum order so now I can check out. I can choose my payment method. I can either go by credit card, pay for it right now. I can go buy PayPal or I could go by bank deposit. There are multiple payment options that you could set up, especially when using a wholesale site. The great thing about it is you can have, because it’s password protected you could have them put the order in and you could do net 30 or you can do net 60 and then that can be imported directly into the accounting system that you’re using.

[00:06:00] Because it’s Shopify it has an API in it where we can actually connect it with your accounting system so it can go straight into if it accepts external inputs. Or you can change or you can run your business where they have to pay for the whole thing upfront based on credit cards. That’s really great to do if you’re doing closeout stuff or you’re doing sample sales or you’re doing that sort of thing where you’re trying to relieve  some of the other products.

That is overview of what we can do with a wholesale environment through Shopify. It’s a great place to expand your business and a really, really nice easy user interface to get away from those Excel spreadsheets and those fax forms we’re so used to.

How to find the variant id of a product

Posted on 15. Aug, 2014 in About Shopify, Advanced Tricks, Tweaks

*** Update: This only works in Firefox or Chrome. Safari doesn’t show a formated XML sheet which makes it almost impossible to find the variant id

[00:0:00] – Finding the Variant ID

I’m going to walk you through on how to find the variant ID of a product. This comes up in a couple of different situations, mostly when we want to generate a link that will take you directly to the checkout page for a client. This happens quite often when we want to say, “Okay. This is a product you want to buy, I’m going to put a link right here in your email. When you click on it, it will take you to the checkout page.”

To find that variant ID, what we want to do is we want to go to “Products”, and then we want to pick a products on and pick our “5 Hour Bucket” here.

This is our product that’s listed on our website. You can go through and buy it. But I want to create a buy now link specifically for one specific customer. When I get to a product, what I can do is I can put a .xml on the end of this product ID and what it will do is it will give us a XML sheet. This is all of the details that is put into a high arcal type of appearance so that you can see all the different pieces in a more cleaner form. When looking for a variant ID, what you want to do is you want to come down here to variants, because there you can see, this is where the variants are left in.
If you have multiple ones, there’s going to be multiple variant boxes here. If this say had different size T-shirts or there were different colors or whatever, each one is going to be a seperate variant, so the id’s will differ depending on which one you’re on. What I’m going to do now is I’m going to go grab this ID integer here. This is the variant ID. I’m actually going to copy that, put that in my clipboard. Now I’m going to show you how to compose an email on how we would actually create this buy button for the reason and why we would need this variant ID.

[00:02:00] – Sending the Email

I’m going to go over to my email. I’m going to login and I’m going to create a new email here. I’m just going to send this to myself so we can see how it all works. This is variant ID test. You need here is the link to the bucket you will need for your website. Then I go 5 hour bucket and I go buy now. Now I want to create this link. I needed that variant ID in order to do that. What I’m going to do is I’m going to select this and I’m going to go to link. Then I’m going to put in my stored URL so http://www.sunbowl.ca/cart/variantid:1

If I wanted to do multiple variant ID, so say I wanted to actually put two products into the shopping cart for them, I could to a “,” and I can do it again. I could put this one and another one and it would add.
But for right now, we’re just going to do a single one. I’m going to hit “Okay” and then I’m going to hit “Thanks”, and then I’m going to send the email.

[00:03:00] – Result

Then when the email comes in, I can check it out and then, okay, I’m ready to buy this bucket. I hit “Buy” and it takes me straight to the checkout page and you can see there is the order. Then all the has more has to do is fill in there information and a way they go.

Shopify makes minor update to admin Dashboard

Posted on 20. Feb, 2014 in About Shopify, Tweaks

Today shopify rolled out a minor update to the administration dashboard. This video will show you how to navigate the new design. There are no new features, just a minor redesign but it looks cleaner and improves the visibility of what matters.

301 Redirects in Shopify. Fixing broken links

Posted on 13. Feb, 2014 in About Shopify, Development, Tweaks

 

How to redirect old pages that no longer exist. Typically when you move from one platform to another the URL format changes. The best way to fix this problem is by using a 301 redirect. This type of redirect will notify google that the location has changed and the change is permanent. I will show you how to setup the 301 redirects through the shopfy dashboard.

Facebook Likes. Organic VS Paid

Posted on 11. Feb, 2014 in Social Media, Tweaks

This video was posted today and its creating quite a stir when it comes to Facebook advertising. I highly suggest you take a look and make your own decision, but from my point of view here is what I see.

The big question, is Facebook advertising a waste of money ?

The short answer is No, its not. The issue isn’t the ads, its the audience. This has been the issue with paid advertising since the beginning of time. Paid growth is always lower quality than organic. I like to compare it to being in school. If you pay people to be your friends, sure they will take your money and stand by you for a bit, but if the going gets tough. Say goodbye to those guys cause they will jump to the highest bidder. Although; if you work hard, build friendship, stand up for other people, take a few punches every now and again. Those friends will stick by you through thick and thin. Facebook likes are similar in this respect. You put yourself out there as a company and do a good job and your people will be knocking down the doors to associate with you. IE: Like your page. (Shameless plug)

So how does this relate to Facebook ads.

So if we stick to the premise that the audience is the issue then we can start doing some very creative targeting when it comes to our growth and using Facebook ads to do it. This is a similar issue that happens with google adwords. You could spend $10 per click on a very generic keyword which would result in a very low ROI and even lower bank balance; Or you could do your research, figure out your audience and buy the cheap keywords that will only result in 1 or 2 clicks but have a substantially higher result. Example: Shopify Expert. ( expensive ) vs Shopify website designer in vancouver. ( cheap )

So how do you do it.

Don’t make the mistake of buying a bunch of likes right off the bat with a generic ad campaign. The number of likes you have on your page does not value you as a business. Also it won’t help, and you probably won’t get you any new clients.

Instead stay focused, pick you keywords and audience. The graph on the side of Facebook audience that says you aren’t reaching enough people, you want it just high enough for them to run it, typically anywhere from 1000 – 10,000 people. The graphic is just a visual guide, it doesn’t do anything. read the numbers and don’t through good money after bad. Try small and see your result, if it works. Refine and grow slowly. Alternatively,  you can also use the upload a contact list module that will select you an audience based on your previous customer base, this is super powerful and accurate. It will allow you to connect directly with like minded clients.

The grain of salt.

I know the virtual cat page seemed like it was specific, but there is a lot of cat lovers out there. Based on what he said, I ran the same campaign and my audience was 24,000,000 people. In 24 million people, you are going to grab a few wildcards. ( 0.00015% ). Not that I’m disregarding his point, because it was a good example. However as an efficient online marketer, you would want to pick a more targeted audience.

I think in closing, I would like to share something that has served me pretty well.

Work on getting 100 amazing customers, not 1,000,000 shitty ones.

Tags vs Metatags vs Hashtags

Posted on 23. Jan, 2014 in About Shopify, Development, Tweaks


This is a brief overview explaining the difference between all the tags in Shopify. The idea is to explain what each on is used for and interesting things you can do with tags in products, collections and blogs.

Add your shopify store to Facebook

Posted on 16. Jan, 2014 in About Shopify, Development, Social Media, Tweaks


This video shows you how to add shopify to your facebook so you community that you have built up can purchase and browse your store directly through facebook. This free app is easy to install and great for coverting your social customers to your website.

Adding Fixed Options to Shopify Products

Posted on 10. Jan, 2014 in About Shopify, Development, Tweaks

This one comes up from time to time. Products that have multiple variances but don’t effect the price. In this example I show how you can add multiple options to your products without having to add 100′s of options in the dashboard. Although from an inventory point of view I suggest adding all the products in, but if you are doing 1 of custom orders this is the perfect solution and you will see its quite easy to do.

How to use blogs to mimic sub pages

Posted on 15. Nov, 2012 in Development, Tweaks

This is a simple way to have shopify automatically create new pages in a menu by using the blog module. Essentially rebranding a blog to appear like a system of pages.

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