Autofill Image Column on Excel

Posted on 09. Feb, 2017 in Advanced Tricks, Development

What’s up guys? Today we’re going to go over something very interesting. A lot of times when you’re transferring from another system, you’re given Excel spreadsheets. Now these spreadsheets typically are in different formats. They’re usually called CSV files. One of the problems that people run into, especially when importing into Shopify, is they’ve imported the spreadsheet, everything works fine, but the only images that seem to import are the images on the first line. Now the reason this happens is because you need to have a handle associated [00:00:30] with every image on every row of the CSV. What I’m going to do is I’m going to show you in Excel how to set up a very easy script, or a little formula, in order to auto fill the columns, so that you have your variant handle as well as the image location next to it so that when you do the import, it actually imports all of the images. This is one that I struggled over for a number of weeks, so it’s … I thought it would be a very helpful thing to show you. [00:01:00] Let’s hop over to it now, and we can go over it.

One of the things you find is, when you’re importing from another import statement, and you’re importing them into Shopify, and it’s only importing the first image, and it’s not importing the rest of it. The reason is, is because you need to have the handle associated with the image in order for it to know where to import it. What I’m going to do is I’m going to show you a quick Excel trick that you can do in order to auto fill this column. [00:01:30] If you don’t do that, what you have to do is you have to go through it and basically drag these down on each one. If you’re dealing with thousands of products, this can be very time consuming. I’m going to show you how to do it in one fill method. First thing you want to do is you want to insert a new column. This is the column that we’re going to use to take over the handle when we’re finished doing the copy and pasting.

First thing we want to do is we want to start using the if statement, because we’re going to do [00:02:00] an if statement to find out whether something is blank or not. We type if, then we open up our if statement. Now the logical test that we’re going to do is we’re going to check to see if the column that we need is blank. If is blank, is blank. Then it needs to have a value put in there. In our case, what we’re going to do is we’re going to check to see if M2 is blank, because what we want it to do is if it’s not blank, [00:02:30] we want it to fill with the item that’s in here. If it is blank, then we want to input our own field. If M2 is blank, then the next portion of it is we need to know if … Tell it what to do if it’s true.

If it’s true, what we’re going to do is we’re going to fill this column with the item that’s above it. The one above it would be M1. The one above it, and then if it’s false, [00:03:00] what we want to do is we actually want to fill it with its current value. If it’s not blank, we want to continue to keep that value. That would become M2. Then we’re going to close that. Once we’ve done that, as long as I have all the commas in the right spot, we should see it pull in the item that’s in the handle here. Now if I drag this down, we should see it auto fill. Actually, hold on. This should be N2, [00:03:30] not M2, my mistake, because we want it to grab the one above. Fills it down and then when we get to the next item, it’ll fill it in with the column down below. We can drag that along. When we get down to the next one, it’ll drag it in. Now what we can do, is we can go and auto fill the entire column with values, and then rename this to handle, and delete handle.

Now when we do the import, what it’s going to do is it’s actually going to take [00:04:00] each individual image, and attach it to a product handle. Then that way, we have all of our images imported. That’s everything you need to know about using the if blank statement in Shopify. Once we finish filling in our columns, and we’ve got all of our handles in the new column that we’ve created, what we’re going to need to do, is we’re going to need to delete out this original column. What we’re going to do, is we’ll call this handle here … Oh, actually, no. What we’re going to do is, we’re going to insert one more blank column. Let me [00:04:30] do that, insert. Then what you want to do is you want to copy all of the stuff that you’ve just generated. We’re going to copy that. Then we’re going to go to this new column that we created, and we’re going to paste values only.

Now if you’re on a PC, you can right click and go paste special, and it will give you the option to paste values only. The reason we want to do this, is because when we eventually delete this column here, so I’m going to do that now. You’ll notice that the one that we created, it’s going [00:05:00] to screw up all the formulas. We want to have a finalized version in just value format, that we can then delete out and clean up everything that’s not needed. I’m now going to delete the reference one that we had before, and we’re going to call this handle. You should be able to now import your newly generated CSV file with all your handles matching up with your images, so now all of the images for your import will show [00:05:30] up underneath your specific products.

Customize the Checkout Page on Shopify Plus

Posted on 23. Aug, 2016 in Development, Shopify Plus, Uncategorized

What’s up guys? Jody here. Today I’m going to go over Shopify Plus’s checkout.liquid. This is the liquid template on how you customize your checkout page. If you have Shopify Regular you’ll notice that all of those checkout situations look a little bit similar, but if you’re a higher level merchant you might want to customize your checkout page so that you get a different user experience. It’s similar across your entire brand. Super powerful features. I’m going to show you how to do that next.

Okay, so you’ve upgraded to Plus, and you want to customize your checkout, and you’re not totally sure how to do it, because when you log into your Shopify dashboard really the only thing you’re seeing that’s different that shows that you’re on Plus versus Shopify Regular is this little logo in the top right-hand corner. I’m going to show you how you do a customized checkout once you’ve gone through the process of upgrading to Plus. The way that this works is it’s like everything else, it’s theme-based. If you go to online store, and then you go to themes. Then you go into your edit HTML/CSS. You’re going to come to your editor.

Now one of the things that’s a little bit tricky for first timers is how do I get to the themed template for the checkout? I don’t see it in this page. Typically, people think they’re going to go to edit template, or look for a template in there and that sort of stuff, but actually where you want to find it is add new layout. When you click add new layout you’ll now have the access to this drop-down menu which allows you to select a checkout layout. Now, because there’s only one type of checkout, you can’t set up multiple ones. What we’re going to do is we’re going to go create layout, and it’s only going to give us this option. Create the layout and then it’s going to generate us out some liquid code.

There’s a couple things in here to keep in mind, and I’m going to go over which each individual one are. The first one is page title, obviously, and content for header. Those are the things that gets pulled from Shopify when building in the checkout page. Same with your checkout [inaudible 00:02:07] suite, and your checkout script, so these are when you click on customize theme and you are under the checkout button at the bottom, here is where these things are being pulled from. This is those built in settings for checkout. Basically it gives you this look and feel. Which is a pretty standardized Shopify layout.

What I’m actually going to do is I’m going to go back to edit HTML. We are going to go and add some quick HTML code in there so you can see how we can start to modify and change out that checkout process. Each one of these little liquid tags that are in the [ulipses 00:02:48], they’re only to be included. You can remove some of them like cont., logo, and order summary and stuff like that. It is recommended that you keep all of them in here, and each one has its own different thing which I will go over in future videos when we start really drilling into Shopify Plus features.

What I’m going to do is, I’m going to show you a quick demo of how to change some of the content on that page. What I’m going to do is I’m going to add a little heading on the right-hand side that says order details on the sidebar. I’m going to go down, and I’m going to find where the sideboard content is [sipped 00:03:20]. I’m going to add in a [div 00:03:21] here. I’m going to give it a nickname H1. I’m going to go order details. Close that off, and close off the div. Then when I save it, and I come back over to my checkout, and I refresh it, because I’m in the active theme what I should see is a rendered version now that I have order details. This kind of customization, and this kind of flexibility when you’re on Plus is super, super powerful. You can create full branded checkout experiences, so that your customers never know that you’ve actually switched over to a Shopify type store. There’s a lot of great things you can do for that.

There’s also checkout scripts which allow you to modify different shipping options and payment options and you can really get granular with that kind of stuff. That’s basically a quick demo of what happens when you’re on Shopify. Shopify Plus that is. Then we can go in and [inaudible 00:04:16] center and modify things around. Thanks guys for watching the video. It was just a little toe dip into the pool of what is Shopify Plus. Remember, if you need any help you can click on the links down below and book a call with me. I’d be happy to walk you through any of the features that you might need to know, or do any custom work for you. Other than that you guys have a great week, and we’ll talk to you next week.

Automatically Apply a Discount Code in Shopify

Posted on 09. Aug, 2016 in Advanced Tricks, Development, Tweaks

How’s it going? I’ve got a lot of things to cover today. I’ve got the Shopify documentary on how they went about going and creating the presentation for when they went public. I’ve got a great demo on how to do discount codes, and there’s been a few slight changes to the app on the Shopify dashboard. That’s all next.

Yesterday, Shopify put on their YouTube channel a short documentary about how they went about for their investors for when they went public. I highly recommend you check it out. I put a link to it right here. I watched this, and this speaks exactly to why all of the partners love Shopify so much, just the way they think about problems and the way they go about this. Next up, we’ve got a quick demo that I’m going to show you on discount codes, and then I’m going to show you how they’ve changed the app page. Let’s jump into it.

Offering discount codes is a great way to encourage shoppers in order to buy additional stuff from your store. One of the great user experiences is if you can automatically apply the discount code when the customer clicks a button or adds a certain number of things to their cart, and there’s a way to do this in Shopify. It’s one of those hidden features that once you find out about it, you can’t believe that you lived without it. What I’m going to do is I’m going to show you how to set that up. The first thing we want to do is we want to go to our dashboard, and we want to actually set up a discount code.

Let’s go to discount codes, and we’re going to add in … I’ve already added in a discount code called cyber deals, but I’m going to add in another one here, and we’re going to call this fall deals, or actually we’re going to call this free shipping. Free shipping. A free shipping discount code, and it’s going to offer free shipping for any shipping rate that’s less than or equal to say $10. It’s going to apply to all countries because that’s all I have set up. For right now, it’s going to be unlimited because it’s going to be auto applied. We’re going to hit save on that, and free shipping is what we’re going to use as our discount code.

The next thing we need to do is we need to actually go in to do some liquid changes. In order to make the discount code automatically apply to someone’s checkout, we need an action in order to do that. I’m going to use a page as a demo just because it’s easier for me to code it, and I don’t have to go into the templates, but this technique is always usable within side your template code. Every individual theme template that you have has different codes so you’re changing might be different in there, but the theory still applies. What we want to do is I’ve gone and created a page here with a free shipping button is what we’re going to put in here. Free shipping.

Then, in the code, what we’re going to do is first we’re going to highlight this. The link that we need to create is a URL stream that will automatically apply this discount code. This URL can be used on any type of button, so if you have a button that you’ve put on your WordPress site, this graphic goes to your Shopify cart or your Shopify store and you want it to apply a discount code because they came through a specific mailing list, you can use this link anyway. It’s just a matter of typing it in correctly. The first thing we want to do is we want to type in checkout because that is where we want the item to go to.

Then we want to have a question mark, which means we’re going to be adding a variable, and the variable we’re going to add in there is called discount. Then we’re going to add the discount code, free shipping, and this is the name of the code that we wanted. We’re going to hit insert link, and we’re going to save that. Then we’re going to jump over and we’re going to view it. We’re going to view the page. Once we’re on the page, we’re going to click on the free shipping link and we’ll see what happens. It now takes us to the checkout page, and we can see that the discount has automatically been applied to this product.

I can remove that and show you that it’s now been earned and we can refresh it. Sorry. Let’s remove that one there because discount is up in here in the URL. We are going to just refresh that there, and then what we can do is we can go back to this here and we can hit it again and we can see that it contains it in there. Anytime that you add the variable discount equals free shipping or discount equals discount code, it will then add it to your checkout, so it really allows you to expand your creativity when it comes to how you apply your discount.

That pretty much does it for this week. Don’t forget to like and subscribe to this video, and if you have any questions, you can always hit me up in the comments down below, or if you have a custom project that you need done, you can always book a call with me and I’d love to talk to you about it. That’s all for this week.

What does handleize mean ?

Posted on 02. Aug, 2016 in Advanced Tricks, Development, Uncategorized

What’s up, guys? Today we’re going to talk about a thing called handleization. Handleization is something that’s in Shopify that takes your file names and puts them in a web safe format. What do I mean by that?

Most servers on the internet run Linux, and Linux has a very unique file system where if you have a file name that looks like this, and then you also have a file name that looks like this, Linux will actually read them as 2 different file names, whereas Windows will see them as a single file name. What does that do? Well, that causes some confusion when you’re trying to look up a file. If we come to what handleization does, handleization basically if you think of it as like a water filter for your file names. It basically takes all the impurities and all the weird stuff that are in your file names, strips them out, and replaces them with really good standards for making your file name.

That’s what Shopify does for you automatically. It takes some of our bad habits and some of the stuff that we’ve gotten used to with using word processors and such in order to put in commas and spaces in our file names, and it strips all that stuff out and it shows you a very clean file name. This can be used in a number of really cool ways. I’m going to hop over to my screen now and show you some of those cool ways, and how handleization within Shopify is actually a very useful tool, and not an annoyance that some people think it is.

Okay, let’s start off with using pages and how Shopify handleizes page titles and so on and so forth, for handles and URL handles. If I’m going to go to my online store, and I’ll go to “Pages”, and I’m going to go and create a new page. I’m going to create a new page, and this page is going to be called “Jody’s Sizing Chart F1I”. What we can see is if we go under “Edit SEO”, we can see that Shopify has automatically handleized the page name. Since this has to be a web safe name, we need to have all of our commas replaced, and all of our spaces replaced, as well as everything needs to be put into lower case. If you look here, we can see that it’s gone and done that for us, so we can go and hit the “Save Page” there.

This is the unique identifier that Shopify uses in order to pull up a specific page from your site. With pages, each page has a handle, and this is the handle that’s generated. If the handle was generated with a quotation mark in it, it would mess up the code and wouldn’t render properly. What would end up happening is the web browser would actually replace the comma with something else. It would probably replace it with a %40, or percent %30 I believe is the correct Unicode for that. We want to make it super easy and readable, and that’s what this handleization does. It doesn’t just do it for pages. It does it for all of your collection. It does it for all your blog posts, and it will also do it for files that you upload to the system. Let’s go over and check that out.

If we go to “Settings”, and we’re going to save this page first, and then when we’re on “Settings”, we’re going to go to “Files”, and I can upload files to Shopify, and it will handleize them automatically for me. Let me go grab a file here.

I’ve now uploaded this file of Sarah the Dog, and you can see it’s gone, and it has replaced all of the spaces in the file names with underscores. That way, when I cut and paste this location that’s given to me by Shopify and pull it up, we will now see a proper URL string, and it pulls up the image like we wanted it to.

That’s showing how it works with inside Shopify when you upload [inaudible 00:04:05]. What if you want to take a stream value and you want to handleize it yourself? That is where we’re going to go on “Liquid Code”. Let’s go to our theme, and we are going to go, and we are going to edit a theme here, and we are going to take the page template. One of the things that we are going to do is we are going to handleize the page title. Say, for example, you wanted to use page titles in order to link them to another collection that has the same title, you wouldn’t be able to do that by title because you might have a problem with the spacing or the way that’s format, but you would be able to do that by handle. What we’re able to do is we’re able to produce a handle by putting in some liquid code. Let’s go and do an example of that.

Let’s take the page title here, “page title”, and then what we’re going to do is we’re going to do a command called “piping”. Piping basically takes whatever your item is and then passes it through a filter. Remember that water filter thing that we had talked about before? We’re going to use that right now. We’re going to pass that through the pipe, and then we’re going to go “Handleize”. You can now see that it pops out the page title properly handleized.

That pretty much covers everything for handleization. There’s a lot of intricate Liquid stuff that you can get into with filters and stuff like that, which we’ll cover in another video, but for now, that kind of wraps up this video. Remember, you can always get ahold of me by leaving a comment down below in the comments, or you can book a call with me, and I’d be happy to walk you through the customization of your Shopify store and what we can maybe do for you. Anyways, that’s everything for today. See you next week.

 

Shopify Dropdowns Part Deux

Posted on 26. Jul, 2016 in Development, Getting Started

What’s up, guys? I’m going to go and show you part 2 of how to make dropdowns with inside Shopify. Part 1 which you can watch right here will go over the basic ideas on how to make dropdown menus, but some themes support mega menus, so those big wide menus where you have a category header and then you have subcategories underneath them across the way, that’s what I’m going to go ahead and show you how to add in today. I’ll put a link down below to the pipeline theme, which is the theme that I’m using to do these mega menus. Great theme. Lots of, lots of options. This is the one that I use for most of my demos. Let’s hop over to the screen now, and we’ll go over how to do that.

Okay, so how to make multiple dropdown menus. If you have a look at this theme, you’ve got the option to have a regular dropdown, but you also have the option to have a mega dropdown. Not all themes support this, but I’m going to show you in this video on how to enable it if you are on a theme that does support it.

The first thing you want to do is you want to go over to your dashboard, and we want to go to Navigations. Now, as in my previous video, I showed you how to do regular dropdown menus, where we created this welcome, and then we created the dropdowns underneath it. I am now going to create additional dropdowns that go underneath those. The way the navigation works on another level is anything that’s inside any one of these handles, so if you create any menu that has the same handle as the title above it, then it will show up down below. I’m going to add a menu here, and I’m going to add a menu called T-shirts. You can see the handle here. This is going to match the previous one on the other page. The first thing I’m going to do is short-sleeve and long-sleeve. I’ll set this to a different product here, and we’re going to go to the long-sleeve. Save that menu.

What we can see now is if we go over here and we refresh it, when we go over top of the welcome, you see we now get a mega menu, and it breaks it up into t-shirts and shorts, and short-sleeves and long-sleeves. If we wanted to add more to this, we could do that. We can simply go to navigations, and let’s add Edit Menu Here, and add another item. We’ll call this pjs, and we’re going to go Sport Shirts. Now, when we go over here and refresh it, we’ll see that we have T-shirts that are pjs that are [short shirts 00:02:44] and then they’re shorts. Depending on how your theme is set up, it’s going to lay it out slightly differently, but basically how this works is it works for your handle, iterates through the items that go below it, and then goes on to the next one, so you can have cascading lists farther and farther down in your theme.

That’s pretty much it for double navigations. Let me know if you have any questions in the comments, and I’d be happy to help you.

Thanks, guys. Like always, you can click up here to subscribe. If you have any questions, you can always hit me up in the comments, or you can book a call with me, and I’d be happy to talk to you about your project.

How to Create Dropdowns in Shopify

Posted on 22. Jul, 2016 in Development, Getting Started

I’m going to go over how to add drop-down menus to your Shopify store. This is something that comes up quite often on desktop machines, for a good user experience, where you hover over top of an item, and then scroll down, and you can go to the different items on it. I’m also going to show you how this affects it on a mobile site, as well. I’m going to hop over right now to the demo store, and we will look how to do that.

Okay, I’m going to walk you through how to make a drop-down menu in Shopify. This is a standard way of doing it for all of the Shopify branded themes. If you’ve gotten your theme through Shopify dot com, then this will work for you. If you’ve gotten your theme through someone like Theme Forest, or you had it custom built by a developer, they might not have used this technique. For 99% of all themes that I’ve run into, this is how you add a drop-down menu.

I’m using the launch pad theme, it’s a very simple theme, and I want to add a drop-down underneath “catalog”. What I’m going to do, is I’m going to go to my dash board, and I’m going to go to “online store”, and then I’m going go to “navigations”. The way drop-downs work, is basically … Shopify goes through and first looks through the main menu, and then it goes and looks at all the other menus that are created in your dash board. It looks for any one that have the same name as an item in main menu.

Here’s an example. If you have a menu created called “catalog”, and you also have one underneath main menu as “catalog”, it’s going to list it underneath. For this example, I’m going to go and create a submmenu of “catalog”. First thing I’m going to do, is I’m going to go “add menu”. Then I want to put in “catalog”. Then, I’m going to put my first item underneath here. We’re going to “about us” first. We’re going to go to “page”, we’re going to select a page, and then we want to put another item underneath that, so “add menu item”. We’re going to go put “t-shirt” underneath here. Then we’re going to select a product. Then we’re going to save this. I added two in there, just so that you could see how it acts when you go into mobile, and that sort of thing.

If we go back over to our store, and we refresh our store, we can see this little arrow has come up, and now you have two items underneath your drop-down menu. If you have a mobily-responsive set theme, which you should have in this day and age, we can go in, and we can turn on the mobile responsive view port. Then, when we click on “menu”, we can see “catalog” shows up, and we can click on the plus sign, and will show us the items underneath it as well.

That’s basically how you set up a drop-down menu in Shopify. Don’t forget to like and subscribe to this video. In the comments, if you have any questions that are specific on drop-downs, you can leave them there, and I would love to get back to you. Have a nice day.

Using Shopify as a Wholesale Tool

Posted on 14. Apr, 2015 in About Shopify, Clients Websites, Development, Tweaks

What Leah had to say about the project

When I decided to build a new wholesale site, I didn’t know where to start. I’m so glad I found the guys at Sunbowl. They did a great job of planning the project with me so that we could create a great user experience. I like to learn how to edit things on my own, so I really appreciated the video tutorials they sent me. They were super helpful with figuring out the technical aspects of the project and were really timely with their delivery. I would highly recommend them to anyone!

The site was a huge success – we generated over 40K in sales in the first month.

Leah Emmott, CEO, Inner Fire Apparel

 

Everybody knows that Shopify is really great for doing your online e-commerce when you’re selling from business to customer. What I’m going to show you is if when you want to use Shopify in order to use it in a business to business situation. For example, I’m going to show you how it works really, really well and powerfully with a wholesale opportunity.

[00:02:00] With my Inner Fire, they already had a Shopify store and they wanted to add a wholesale component to that store. What we were able to do was use a second Shopify store in order to set that up for them. When you’re on the regular shop, just to compare. If we were a regular shopper and we wanted to buy some leggings we would pick the leggings that we wanted, then we would read through the descriptions and then we would add them to the cart and then we would get to check out.
We can change our quantities. We could see what we were purchasing and check out in a normal fashion. That works very well for buying single products. However, when you’re buying multiple products and if you’re doing a group buy, it’s not the best system to use because it’s very cumbersome and it’s hard to make sure that you got your orders correct. We did a little bit of a different approach to how to do it for a wholesale side of things.
Two things, one, the first thing we did is we wanted to make sure the wholesale side was password protected. There’s a lot of reasons for doing this. We wanted to be able to approve accounts for people to get there because they have to go through a certain credit check first. They have to be authorized dealers. There’s a lot of extra stuff that happens when you’re dealing with just wholesale clients.
When you go to the wholesale in your Fire account, it will take you to a login where the customer would then be able to log in and get to their site. Once they’ve logged in, they come to a nicely designed site just like you would normally have. If we were to go to the homepage it would come up wholesale site, very similar to their other site.

You can look up all different information. They have their polices, they have their FAQs, they have their look book, they have their catalogs. A lot of this stuff is new lines that are coming out that are not available to the public so it’s a different inventory.

When you go and actually select a t-shirt, which I have a sample here, you can see that the layout is slightly different than it was on their online store. The reason we built it this way was because we were finding it was very cumbersome to be adding one product to each cart by just copying over your existing store. There’s a lot of tweaks that need to happen when you’re opening up a second wholesale store.

The first thing with these guys is that you’re able to pick the graphics. I’m going to pick believe in yourself and I’m going to pick with a gray tanktop. We come down here and we get this great chart that tells us which products are in stock, which ones were out of stock and which ones we’re able to order. Theoretically, I can order 15 smalls, I can order four mediums, and I can order two larges. Say I wanted also to get the try coffee ones, I could order 20 here as well, maybe 10 here. Maybe they’re a little bit more popular and it will add them up on the right hand side.

These are just sample pricing that I’ve put in here for the purpose of this video but you can see that each item gets added together and it gives you a line item so you know how much each one of them is going to cost. If you’ve only got a specific budget, say you wanted to put a couple numbers in here and you knew that you only have $170 to spend on these particular items it’ll allow you to add it all up.
When you’re finished you can hit the Add to Cart icon. It will process everything and it will add it to the cart. It will add all your items to the cart. You could see your total number of items that are going to be checked out is 156. That only took me a couple seconds to put into the system, but if I was to do that one by one it would be a very cumbersome style of adding stuff over.

[00:04:00] If I go over to the cart, I can then see a preview of everything that I’m going to order. I can see the colors of my shirts. I can click on and see the graphic that I want to be able to be printed on the shirt. I could update my quantities and then I can also check my additional options. Do you need your items priced and is back ordering okay or are substitutions okay? It might be okay for you.

I can then go to my checkout and I can proceed through my checkout like I normally would. The cool thing about when you do the checkout is you’re able to go to checkout and you have to do a $300 minimum order so that you’re not dealing with these small order. Obviously if you’re a wholesale person and then you know you have the minimum order you need to make and you can make these type of check, it’s a user-friendly interface for buyers.
The buyers can sit down. They can really visually see what you’re looking at. They’re not looking through a catalog or filling out an Excel spreadsheet. Everything is accurately itemized and you can see the graphics of things that are going on and it works out very, very well. I’m going to update some of these here too a little bit more. I’m going to say I’m going to get 300 of them.

Refresh it there and now I’m above my minimum order so now I can check out. I can choose my payment method. I can either go by credit card, pay for it right now. I can go buy PayPal or I could go by bank deposit. There are multiple payment options that you could set up, especially when using a wholesale site. The great thing about it is you can have, because it’s password protected you could have them put the order in and you could do net 30 or you can do net 60 and then that can be imported directly into the accounting system that you’re using.

[00:06:00] Because it’s Shopify it has an API in it where we can actually connect it with your accounting system so it can go straight into if it accepts external inputs. Or you can change or you can run your business where they have to pay for the whole thing upfront based on credit cards. That’s really great to do if you’re doing closeout stuff or you’re doing sample sales or you’re doing that sort of thing where you’re trying to relieve  some of the other products.

That is overview of what we can do with a wholesale environment through Shopify. It’s a great place to expand your business and a really, really nice easy user interface to get away from those Excel spreadsheets and those fax forms we’re so used to.

Shopify Dashboard Update

Posted on 02. Apr, 2015 in About Shopify, Development

I’m going to do an overview of the new Shopify upgrade from Multi-Channel Support. This is a new update that they’re going to be rolling out in the next couple of weeks.
First, they’re going to roll it out to five percent of people, then to twenty-five percent of people, then to a hundred percent of people over the next month or so.

The biggest change that’s being done is they’re now making Shopify the central dashboard for all of your online sales. The way that they’re doing that is they’re adding these links on the left-hand side here to allow for each individual channel.
Right now, when you set up your Shopify store as a new store, you’re going to get online store and point of sales. That’s if you’re using the point of sales system.

If you’re going to be also using “buy now” button, which you can use to put onto a WordPress site, or you can use to put onto a Square Space site. What you’ll need to do is you’ll need to go to “settings”. Then you’ll need to go to “sales channels” in order to turn it on. It’ll give you your multiple sales channels below you and simply hit “add channel”. I want to add a Shopify Buy button and what you’ll see is on the left you’ll now have the buy button channel which will be added into your store.
The first thing I need to do to use this, is I’m going to need to go and create products. What I’m going to to do is I’m going to go through the other changes and show you were the other stuff is. Then I’ll come back and show you how the buy button new app works.

First of all, what they’ve done is they’ve shortened down the product list, or the navigation list on the left-hand side, and combined a bunch of things. Either you’re working in your home dashboard which is a whole new slew of updates as well as information pieces that come in. They all feed in from the sales channels on the left.

You have your orders page which is as similar as it always was before. When you have new orders in here they will show up in here. The order tracking and the order fulfillment is remaining the same.

[00:02:00] For the most part, not a lot is going be changing. It’s all the external services that you’re going to be working on that’ll change.

If you go into products, you can see now that this small little list slides over. Now you can see where you actually add products. This is adding an additional click to the navigation. Time will tell whether it’ll be annoying or not, but from what I can see it looks like it’s a pretty good idea. You’ve now got product list, inventory, your collections and your gift cards all underneath your same product dialogue box.

The next one is customers. This is similar to the customer dashboard before. It hasn’t changed at all.

Reports, again, also hasn’t changed. Still the similar reports.

The same with discount codes. Discount codes are being done the same way.

The biggest change is where you’re going to go in order to get access to your theme settings. If you go to “online store”, you can see this is where you’re going to get access to doing your overview, your blog post, changes to your pages, your themes, your navigation and your domains. For us as Shopify experts, this was the biggest change for us because we need to be able to go in and modify themes and so on and so forth.
Once you get into the actual pages themselves, they’re exactly the same as they were before. It’s just the navigation that you need to use to get there is an additional click now.
Point of sale, same thing. You have your overview and your locations like you would previously.

Next is the buy button. The new buy button app that I was talking about.

Finally, the settings button on the left will allow you to change all your settings. Your general, your payment, your checkout, your shipping, your taxes, your notifications, your gift cards, your files, your account. Again, your sales channels. As well as your settings for the online store and the point of sales store.

That is pretty much the major changes.

[00:04:00] If you click on this guy here, this is your “view your website” button. It used to be down at the bottom. They’ve removed those buttons down from the bottom now and they’ve moved them up here so if you’re looking for “view your website”, that’s where that one is. If you click on here this is your new log in/log out button. As well as your “hire an expert” and your community forums as well.
They’ve reduced the number of buttons they have on the navigation in order to make it a little bit cleaner for you to use as well.

If you have any comments or you would like to know where something is, leave it in the comments down below.

Good luck with the new dashboard

Resource: Shopify Blog Post

301 Redirects in Shopify. Fixing broken links

Posted on 13. Feb, 2014 in About Shopify, Development, Tweaks

 

How to redirect old pages that no longer exist. Typically when you move from one platform to another the URL format changes. The best way to fix this problem is by using a 301 redirect. This type of redirect will notify google that the location has changed and the change is permanent. I will show you how to setup the 301 redirects through the shopfy dashboard.

50 Ways to Make Your First Sale

Posted on 05. Feb, 2014 in Development, Ecommerce, Getting Started

Screen Shot 2014-02-05 at 11.57.34 AM

This morning I received an amazing resource from Shopify. This free ebook has dozens and dozens of great pieces of advice to help you get your store going. So good infact, I couldn’t just keep it for myself. Check it out Free Ebook